Friday, June 25, 2010


Author Unknown

One night a man had a dream. He dreamed he was walking along the beach with the Lord. Across the sky flashed scenes from his life. For each scene, he noticed two sets of footprints in the sand; one belonging to him, and the other to the Lord.

When the last scene of his life flashed before him he looked back at the footprints in the sand. He noticed that many times along the path of his life there was only one set of footprints. He also noticed that it happened at the very lowest and saddest times in his life.

This really bothered him and he questioned the Lord about it. "Lord, you said that once I decided to follow you, you'd walk with me all the way. But I have noticed that during the most troublesome times in my life, there is only one set of footprints. I don't understand why when I needed you most you would leave me."

The Lord replied, "My precious, precious child, I love you and I would never leave you. During your times of trial and suffering, when you see only one set of footprints, it was then that I carried you."

Friday, June 18, 2010

God's Coffee

God's Coffee

A group of alumni, highly established in their careers, got together to visit their old university professor. Conversation soon turned into complaints about stress in work and life.
Offering his guests coffee, the professor went to the kitchen and returned with a large pot of coffee and an assortment of cups - porcelain, plastic, glass, crystal, some plain looking, some
expensive, some exquisite - telling them to help themselves to the coffee.

When all the students had a cup of coffee in hand, the professor said:
"If you noticed, all the nice looking expensive cups were taken up, leaving behind the plain and cheap ones. While it is normal for you to want only the best for yourselves, that is the source of your problems and stress.
Be assured that the cup itself adds no quality to the coffee. In most cases it is just more expensive and in some cases even hides what we drink.
What all of you really wanted was coffee, not the cup, but you consciously went for the best cups... And then you began eyeing each other's cups.
Now consider this: Life is the coffee; the jobs, money and position in society are the cups. They are just tools to hold and contain Life, and the type of cup we have does not define, nor change the quality of Life we live.
Sometimes, by concentrating only on the cup, we fail to enjoy the coffee God has provided us."
God brews the coffee, not the cups.......... Enjoy your coffee! 
"The happiest people don't have the best of everything. They just make the best of everything."
Live simply. Love generously. Care deeply. Speak kindly. Leave the rest to God.

-Author unknown

Sunday, June 6, 2010


Desiderata - Max Ehrmann - 1906

Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence. As far as possible without surrender, Be on good terms with all persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly, and listen to others - Even the dull and ignorant, they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive persons - they are vexations to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter, For always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.

Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans. Keep interested in your own career - However humble, it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. Exercise caution in your business affairs, for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is. Many persons strive for high ideals, and everywhere life is full of heroism. Be yourself. Especially do not feign affection, neither be cynical about love. For in the face of all aridity and disenchantment, It is as perennial as the grass. Take kindly the council of the years, Gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune, But do not distress yourself with imaginings - Many fears are borne of fatigue and loneliness. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself.

You are a child of the universe. No less than the trees and the stars, you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, No doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

Therefore, be at peace with God, whatever you conceive him to be. And whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life, Keep peace with your soul. With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be careful. Strive to be happy.

Wednesday, June 2, 2010

Where was God?

Where was God?
Unknown writer

"I know you're angry with Me right now. That's all right. People have been angry with Me before and will be again. Being angry is part of being human. My Son got angry, too. It's all right to be angry sometimes at injustice, for example, or the lack of charity.

"You probably think I am unjust and uncharitable when an airplane goes down like that. All those people lost. The children gone. It doesn't seem right; it can't be loving. You ask, 'Where was God?' Why did He allow that to happen?

"I allow it to happen because I allow you freedom. I could have left you on a string and made you dance all day without getting tired. I could have moved your mouth for you and made you sing all night without growing hoarse. I could have pulled a wire that would have let you soar skyward and never fall.

"I could have, but I didn't because I love you so much. I want you to be free to decide when to dance and sing. Free to determine when you will come to Me in faith and hope. Because you are free, some of you choose not to dance or sing. Some of you select hatred over love, revenge over forgiveness, bombs over a helping hand. As you choose, I watch. I do not disappear. I listen to both the songs and the bombs. AND I REMEMBER.

"Where was God?" you wonder...I was there. I whispered in the ear of a little girl, 'Don't be afraid, I am with you.' I held the hand of a business woman as tightly as she clutched mine. I cradled a pilot against my shoulder as if he were a baby again.

"Amid the paralysing fear, I was there, as I was there with my Son in the garden. Amid the unbearable pain, I was there, as I was with Him as He was whipped. Amid the terrible realisation that life was ending too soon, I was there, with Him as He hung on the cross and asked, like you, 'My God, why have you forsaken Me?'

"I had not forsaken Him. I did not forsake them. I was there as they fell, and as they rose to eternal joy. I listened to their anger, answered their questions and showed them why they had been created. Not to end that way, but to live with Me forever.

"In an instant, they came into existence. As you did. In an instant, they left this world. As you will. But beyond that last instant, I kept my promise...A little girl dances, a business woman sings, and a pilot keeps his wings forever."

Ice Sculpture from unknown artist
(If anyone knows who should be credited please email that information)

Sunday, May 30, 2010

"Take things one day at a time" by Laurie Wymer

"Take things one day at a time"

In time you will smile again and truely feel it,
and your laughter will be genuine.
But until your pain has gone away,
and our sadness has disappeared,
dont feel you have to be strong.
What your feeling is real.
Dont feel like your wrong
if you want to cry.

There are some roads in life
thta we must travel alone,
even though we may be
surrounded by people whom we love.
Some things in life
such as things you are feeling now,
can't be felt by anyone but you.

But just remember
you are not alone at all;
everyone who loves yu
is walking with you in spirit,
and will be there with you.
you'll find a new strength,
a new peace,
and a new happiness.
It just takes a little time.

(Laurie Wymer)


Author Unknown

If I knew it would be the last time, that I'd see you fall asleep,
I would tuck you in more tightly, and pray the Lord, your soul to keep.

If I knew it would be the last time, that I see you walk out the door,
I would give you a hug and kiss, and call you back for one more.

If I knew it would be the last time, I'd hear your voice lifted up in praise,
I would video tape each action and word, so I could play them back day after day.

If I knew it would be the last time, I could spare an extra minute or two,
to stop and say "I love you," instead of assuming you would KNOW I do.

If I knew it would be the last time, I would be there to share your day,
well I'm sure you'll have so many more, so I can let just this one slip away.

For surely there's always tomorrow, to make up for an oversight,
and we always get a second chance, to make everything all right.

There will always be another day, to say our "I love you",
And certainly there's another chance, to say our 'Anything I can do's?'

But just in case I might be wrong, and today is alI I get,
I'd like to say how much I love you, and I hope we never forget.

Tomorrow is not promised to anyone, young or old alike,
And today may be the last chance, you get to hold your loved one tight.

So if you're waiting for tomorrow, why not do it today?
For if tomorrow never comes, you'll surely regret the day.

That you didn't take that extra time, for a smile, a hug, or a kiss
and you were too busy to grant someone, what turned out to be their one last wish.

So hold your loved ones close today, and whisper in their ear,
Tell them how much you love them, and that you'll always hold them dear.

Take time to say "I'm sorry," "Please forgive me," "thank you," or "its okay."
And if tomorrow never comes, you'll have no regrets about today.

Thursday, May 27, 2010

He Will Find You by John Powell

    "He Will Find You"
    By John Powell

    (Rev 3:20 KJV) Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me.

    John Powell, A Professor at Loyola University in Chicago writes about a student in his Theology of Faith class named Tommy...

    Some twelve years ago, I stood watching my university students file into the classroom for our first session in the Theology of Faith. That was the first day I first saw Tommy. My eyes and my mind both blinked.  He was combing his long flaxen hair, which hung six inches below his shoulders. It was the first time I had ever seen a boy with hair that long.  I guess it was just coming into fashion then.

    I know in my mind that it isn't what's on your head, but what's in it that counts; but on that day I was unprepared and my emotions flipped. I immediately filed Tommy under "S" for strange . . . very strange.

    Tommy turned out to be the "atheist in residence" in my Theology of Faith course.  He constantly objected to, smirked at, or whined about the possibility of an unconditionally loving Father-God. We lived with each other in relative peace for one semester, although I admit, he was for me at times a serious pain in the back pew.

    When he came up at the end of the course to turn in his final exam, he asked in a slightly cynical tone: "Do you think I'll ever find God?"

    I decided instantly on a little shock therapy. "No!" I said very emphatically.

    "Oh," he responded, "I thought that was the product you were pushing."

    I let him get five steps from the classroom door and then called out, "Tommy! I don't think you'll ever find him, but I am absolutely certain that he will find you!" He shrugged a little and left my class and my life.

    I felt slightly disappointed at the thought that he had missed my clever line: "He will find you!" At least I thought it was clever. Later I heard that Tommy had graduated and I was duly grateful.

    Then a sad report, I heard that Tommy had terminal cancer. Before I could search him out, he came to see me. When he walked into my office, his body was very badly wasted, and the long hair had all fallen out as a result of chemotherapy. But his eyes were bright and his voice was firm, for the first time, I believe.

    "Tommy, I've thought about you so often.  I hear you are sick!" I blurted out.

    "Oh, yes, very sick. I have cancer in both lungs. It's a matter of weeks."

    "Can you talk about it, Tom?"

    "Sure, what would you like to know?"

    "What's it like to be only twenty-four and dying?"

    "Well, it could be worse."

    "Like what?"

    "Well, like being fifty and having no values or ideals, like being fifty and thinking that booze, seducing women, and making money are the real 'biggies' in life."

    I began to look through my mental file cabinet under "S" where I had filed Tommy as strange. (It seems as though everybody I try to reject by classification God sends back into my life to educate me.)

    But what I really came to see you about," Tom said, "is something you said to me on the last day of class."

    (He remembered!)

    He continued, "I asked you if you thought I would ever find God and you said, 'No!' which surprised me. Then you said,
    'But he will find you.' I thought about that a lot, even though my search for God was hardly intense at that time.

    (My "clever" line. He thought about that a lot!)

    But when the doctors removed a lump from my groin and told me that it was malignant, then I got serious about locating God.  And when the malignancy spread into my vital organs, I really began banging bloody fists against the bronze doors of heaven. But God did not come out. In fact, nothing happened.

    Did you ever try anything for a long time with great effort and with no success? You get psychologically glutted, fed up with trying. And then you quit. Well, one day I woke up, and instead of throwing a few more futile appeals over that high brick wall to a God who may be or may not be there, I just quit. I decided that I didn't really care ...about God, about an afterlife, or anything like that. I decided to spend what time I had left doing something more profitable. I thought about you and your class and I remembered something else you had said: 'The essential sadness is to go through life without loving. But it would be almost equally sad to go through life and leave this world without ever telling those you loved that you had loved them.' "So I began with the hardest one: my Dad. He was reading the newspaper when I approached him."

    "Dad". . .  "Yes, what?" he asked without lowering the newspaper.  "Dad, I would like to talk with you."  "Well, talk."

    "I mean. .. . It's really important."  The newspaper came down three slow inches. "What is it?"  "Dad, I love you. I just wanted you to know that."

    Tom smiled at me and said with obvious satisfaction, as though he felt a warm and secret joy flowing inside of him.

    The newspaper fluttered to the floor. "Then my father did two things I could never remember him ever doing before. He cried and he hugged me. And we talked all night, even though he had to go to work the next morning. It felt so good to be close to my father, to see his tears, to feel his hug, to hear him say that he loved me.  It was easier with my mother and little brother. They cried with me, too, and we hugged each other, and started saying real nice things to each other. We shared the things we had been keeping secret for so many years.  I was only sorry about one thing, that I had waited so long. Here I was just beginning to open up to all the people I had actually been close to.

    Then, one day I turned around and God was there.

    He didn't come to me when I pleaded with him. I guess I was like an animal trainer holding out a hoop, 'C'mon, jump through.' 'C'mon, I'll give you three days .. . three weeks.' Apparently God does things in his own way and at his own hour. But the important thing is that he was there. He found me.  You were right. He found me even after I stopped looking for him."

    "Tommy," I practically gasped, "I think you are saying something very important and much more universal than you realize. To me, at least, you are saying that the surest way to find God is not to make him a private possession, a problem solver, or an instant consolation in time of need, but rather by opening to love. You know, the Apostle John said that. He said God is love, and anyone who lives in love is living with God and God is living in him.

    'Tom, could I ask you a favor? You know, when I had you in class you were a real pain. But (laughingly) you can make it all up to me now. Would you come into my present Theology of Faith course and tell them what you have just told me? If I told them the same thing it wouldn't be half as effective as if you were to tell them."

    "Oooh . . . I was ready for you, but I don't know if I'm ready for your class."

    "Tom, think about it. If and when you are ready, give me a call."

    In a few days Tommy called, said he was ready for the class, that he wanted to do that for God and for me. So we scheduled a date.  However, he never made it. He had another appointment, far more important than the one with me and my class. Of course, his life was not really ended by his death, only changed. He made the great step from faith into vision. He found a life far more beautiful than the eye of man has ever seen or the ear of man has ever heard or the mind of man has ever imagined.

    Before he died, we talked one last time. "I'm not going to make it to your class," he said.

    "I know, Tom."

    "Will you tell them for me? Will you. . . tell the whole world for me?"

    "I will, Tom. I'll tell them. I'll do my best."

    So, to all of you who have been kind enough to read this simple statement about love, thank you for reading. And to you, Tommy, somewhere in the sunlit, verdant hills of heaven: "I told them, Tommy . ... as best I could."
    A true story and is not enhanced for publicity purposes.